Data Visualization

Data Blog of the Week: Dear Data

One of the fun parts of writing a data oriented blog is all of the other interesting data bloggers I have stumbled across as I prepare our own content.   Since no single blog could ever have a monopoly on all the great data insights, I thought it would be a nice addition to feature a data blog of the week for our readers.   We start off with a great blog worth checking out: Dear Data. (@_deardata)

Dear Data is a blog that highlights weekly post cards which contain hand drawn data visualizations capturing data between two bloggers--Stefanie in Europe and Giorgia in the United States.   As the blog explains:

"Each week we collect and measure a particular type of data about our lives, use this data to make a drawing on a postcard-sized sheet of paper, and then drop the postcard in an English “postbox” (Stefanie) or an American “mailbox” (Giorgia)!

Eventually, the postcard arrives at the other person’s address with all the scuff marks of its journey over the ocean: a type of “slow data” transmission.

By creating and sending the data visualizations using analogue instead of digital means, we are really just doing what artists have done for ages, which is sketch and try to capture the essence of the life happening around them. However, as we are sketching life in the modern digital age, life also includes everything that is counted, computed, and measured."

Some press coverage of the Dear Data blog can be found in the Washington Post and featured on the Brain Pickings blog (@brainpicker)

London in Spring Time

Source: http://sosyalinsan.deviantart.com/

Source: http://sosyalinsan.deviantart.com/

"Sir, when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life.  for there is in London all that life can afford."     - Samuel Johnson

Over the last few weeks, I have stumbled upon a surprising number of data related visualizations that capture various aspects of the city of London.   Unlike some of our other posts, there is no particular statistical theme, but rather just a range of different data snapshots of a great European city.

Source: http://willgallia.com/content/images/tubebeg.jpg

Source: http://willgallia.com/content/images/tubebeg.jpg

First, a "living breathing transit map" found on the City Lab website and created by Will Gallia. This map is based on "562,145 journeys on the London Underground network" druing a single week in 2009.   Along the same lines, here is a traffic visualization for London created by 422 South CGI and Visual FX.

source: http://422.com/work/data-visualization-of-london-traffic-for-here.com

source: http://422.com/work/data-visualization-of-london-traffic-for-here.com

Next, a series of interactive maps of London brought to you by the beta website Place I Live. One can configure the map to show a wide range of things, including population density, bagel shops, and in this example, air pollution density.

Finally, if you are in the mood for more London data visualizations, the book London, The Information Capital by James Chesire and Oliver Alberti is for you.  I stumbled upon this in preparing this blog, and it looks terrific.  I also suggest this blog by one of the authors, James Cheshire ( @spatialanalysis) called spatial.ly.  In this particularly relevant post, he describes how London continues to be at the forefront of open data initiatives.



                                                         

Graphing Calorie Intake with...Food!

Source: Ryan MacEachern

Source: Ryan MacEachern

In this brilliant series of data visualizations titled design x food, Ryan MacEachern reports various metrics of his food consumption graphically using... FOOD!   I was very excited to randomly find this pop-tart calorie graph on-line when searching for infographics, which led me to the beautiful colored bean chart used to report fat and protein content.  These visuals are a truly striking and creative illustration of everydata.   The full presentation can be viewed hereRyan's other data visualization projects can be found on his behance page.

50000 Species, One Visual!

This infographic featured as Fast Company's Infographic of the Day is truly amazing.  It is a visual by biologists at Temple University that captures evolution of species.  As the article says, if the visual was set up linearly end to end, it would have taken 100s of pages.  Thus the great idea to create the circular depiction of the tree of life.  Striking, informative, and creative.  Great use of everydata!